Frank Riedewald, Kieran Goode, Aidan Sexton and Maria Sousa-Gallagher publish a paper on Composite Recycling’s tyre pyrolysis process in MethodsX entitled “Scrap tyre recycling process with molten zinc as direct heat transfer and solids separation fluid: A new reactor concept”

Frank Riedewald, Kieran Goode, Aidan Sexton and Maria Sousa-Gallagher, publish a paper on the Composite Recycling’s tyre pyrolysis process in MethodsX entitled “Scrap tyre recycling process with molten zinc as direct heat transfer and solids separation fluid: A new reactor concept”.

Download this paper (open access) here:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S221501611630019X

 

Abstract of this paper is:

Every year about 1.5 billion tyres are discarded worldwide representing a large amount of solid waste, but also a largely untapped source of raw materials. The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel scrap tyre recycling process which uses molten zinc as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this media to separate the solids products (i.e. steel and rCB) in a sink-float separation at an operating temperature of 450–470 C.

This methodology involved:

  • construction of the laboratory scale batch reactor,
  • separation of floating rCB from the zinc,
  • recovery of the steel from the bottom of the reactor following pyrolysis

Frank Riedewald and Maria Sousa-Gallagher authored a presentation on our tyre recycling process at “ETRA 2016″ entitled: “Technological and economical feasibility of a 40,000 t/y tyre pyrolysis plant: results of a H2020 SME Phase 1 study”

“Technological and economical feasibility of a 40,000 t/y tyre pyrolysis plant: results of a H2020 SME Phase 1 study”,

Dr Frank Riedewald, Managing Director, Composite Recycling Ltd, Cork, Ireland
Dr Maria Sousa-Gallagher, Process and Chemical Engineering, University College Cork, Ireland
ETRA conference, 18th March 2016

You can download the pdf file 09 Tyre presentation ETRA 2016.

Philipp Rathsack, Frank Riedewald, Maria Sousa-Gallagher, publish a paper on the analysis of the pyrolysis oil in the Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis entitled “Analysis of pyrolysis liquid obtained from whole tyre pyrolysis with molten zinc as the heat transfer media using comprehensive gas chromatography mass spectrometry”

Please read more here.

Abstract:

Pyrolysis of scrap tyres is a promising technology to recover valuable materials such as pyrolysis liquids, carbon black and steel. Pyrolysis liquids are complex mixtures of organic compounds and may represent a valuable source for chemicals. And because pyrolysis liquids are complex mixtures, high resolution analytical methods are required to accurately characterize these liquids. In this study comprehensive gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS) using a reversed column setup (polar×apolar) was used for the analysis of a pyrolysis liquid. The tyre pyrolysis liquid analyzed was obtained from a process which places whole tyres onto molten zinc (460–480 °C) providing direct heat transfer and hence rapid pyrolysis.

The results show, that the pyrolysis liquid is a complex mixture of acyclic and cyclic, aliphatic, unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons and several heteroatomic compounds. Compared to a normal column setup (apolar×polar), the reversed column setup separates structurally similar acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbon compounds with different degree of unsaturation better. A quantification was performed for a set of 40 compounds. A qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the compounds found, that the composition of the pyrolysis liquid is typical for tyre pyrolysis liquids. Nevertheless, comparably high amounts of limonene of 6.6 % (w/w) and low amounts of monocyclic aromatic compounds were found. This is attributed to the very high heating rate of this process due to the direct heat contact of the tyres with molten zinc.

Frank Riedewald and Maria Sousa-Gallagher authored a paper on our PCB recycling process entitled “Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt” published by MethodsX.

Download the article from Elsevier Science, February 2015.

The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450–470 _C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, allowing molten salt access from different depths for metal recovery. A laboratory scale batch reactor was constructed using 316L as suitable construction material. For safety reasons, the inert, stable LiCl–KCl molten salts were used as direct heat transfer fluid. Recovered materials were washed with hot water to remove residual salt before metal recovery assessment. The impact of this work was to show metal separation using molten salts in one single unit, by using this novel reactor methodology.

  • The reactor is a U-shaped reactor filled with a continuous liquid with a sloped bottom representing a novel reactor concept.
  • This method uses large PCB pieces instead of shredded PCBs as the reactor volume is 2.2 L.
  • The treated PCBs can be removed via leg B while the process is on-going.